• President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign paid most of the women who worked for it nearly 20% less than their male counterparts, a court filing says, citing an analysis by an economist.
  • The filing is part of a federal lawsuit by Alva Johnson, a black woman who worked on Trump’s campaign and who claims that he kissed her without her consent at a campaign rally in August 2016. Johnson is alleging gender and race discrimination in her suit.
  • Omarosa Manigault Newman, a black woman who worked on Trump’s campaign as director of African American outreach, has submitted a declaration in Johnson’s case backing her effort.

President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign paid most of the women who worked for it — including notorious “The Apprentice” contestant Omarosa Manigault Newman — 20% less than their male counterparts, a court filing said Monday.

The filing, part of a lawsuit against Trump, says that an analysis has found that other than a “small handful of employees in senior leadership roles,” female workers on the campaign were paid on average $3,865 per month and “males were paid $4,568 — a stunning gap of 18.2 percent.”

The campaign “maintained a common policy … of paying female employees less than their male counterparts for the same or similar work,” says the filing by Alva Johnson, a former Trump campaign worker.

In Johnson’s suit filed earlier this year in federal court in Tampa, Florida, she alleged that Trump kissed her without her consent at a campaign rally in August 2016.

Johnson, who is black, in her suit alleges gender and race discrimination, claiming she was paid less than white or male colleagues even though she excelled at her job of organizing volunteers and planning rallies.

The White House has said Johnson’s claim of Trump kissing her is false and contradicted by several eyewitnesses.

Neither the Trump campaign nor a lawyer for the president and his reelection effort immediately responded to CNBC’s request for comment Monday on Johnson’s new filing and the analysis of pay and gender.

Johnson is asking to be named the lead plaintiff for a collective action by other women who were paid less by the Trump campaign than male workers. Her suit says that she was paid $3,000 per month from January to August 2016 and $4,000 per month from September 2016 until she left the campaign, which was “considerably less than that paid to male Campaign staff who had the same responsibilities as she did and lower even than male Campaign staff who had fewer responsibilities than she did.”

The analysis of pay by the Trump campaign, which was conducted by economist Phillip Johnson, was used to bolster her bid. In her filing Monday, Alva Johnson asked a judge to require that Trump’s campaign identify all potential members of a proposed collective action.

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